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Upcoming Other Workshops

  1. Berlekamp Memorial Workshop on Combinatorial Games

    Organizers: Svenja Huntemann (Carleton University), Richard Nowakowski (Dalhousie University), Aaron Siegel (Airbnb)
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    Elwyn Berlekamp (1937-2019) was a pioneering contributor to combinatorial game theory, greatly advancing the subject over the course of a more than five-decade career. Along with his coauthors, John Conway and Richard Guy, Berlekamp invented the modern form of the theory, with the publication of Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays in 1982. His later work substantially advanced our understanding of the mathematical structure of well-known games such as Go, Amazons, and Dots-and-Boxes. More information about his life can be found at www.msri.org/elwyn.


    This workshop will be an informal two-day mini-conference honoring Berlekamp's work and the subject he helped create. The event will consist of talks, afternoon workshops, and a combinatorial games tournament.

    Updated on Aug 28, 2019 06:09 PM PDT
  2. Symposium in Honor of Julia Robinson’s 100th Birthday

    Organizers: Hélène Barcelo (MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), Thomas Scanlon (University of California, Berkeley), Carol Wood (Wesleyan University)

    A Symposium on the occasion of Julia Robinson’s 100th birthday will be held on Monday December 9, 2019 at MSRI. Julia Robinson (1919-1985) was a leading mathematical logician of the twentieth century, and notably a first in many ways, including the first woman president of the American Mathematical Society and the first woman mathematician elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences. Her most famous work, together with Martin Davis and Hilary Putnam, led to Yuri Matiyasevich's solution in the negative of Hilbert’s Tenth Problem, showing that  there is no general algorithmic solution for  Diophantine equations. She contributed in other topics as well. Her 1948 thesis  linked the undecidability of the field of rational numbers to Godel’s proof of undecidability of the ring of integers.  Confirmed participants in this day-long celebration of her work and of current mathematics insprired by her research include: Lenore Blum, who will give a public lecture, Lou van den Dries, Martin Davis, Kirsten Eisentrager, and Yuri Matiyasevich.

    Updated on Aug 14, 2019 12:48 PM PDT
  3. Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2020: Today’s Mathematics, Social Justice, and Implications for Schools

    Organizers: Meredith Broussard (New York Unviersity), Michael Driskill (Math for America ), Moon Duchin (Tufts University), Jordan Ellenberg (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Cliff Freeman (The Young People's Project), Nicole Joseph (Vanderbilt University), Luis Leyva (Vanderbilt University), Yeshi Milner (Data for Black Lives), LEAD Katherine Stevenson (California State University, Northridge), William Tate (Washington State University in St. Louis)

    Sophisticated computational and quantitative techniques drive important decision-making in modern society. Such methods and algorithms are meant to improve the efficiency with which we work and the ways in which we live. An understanding the mathematical underpinnings of these techniques can be used either to disrupt or to purpetuate inequities, and thus such knowledge constitutes power in the modern world. How does this powerful knowledge get used for the common good and get passed on to our children equitably? What does it imply about the kinds of mathematical skills, practices, and dispositions students should learn in schools, colleges, and universities?

    Updated on Aug 14, 2019 12:29 PM PDT